CRESR
CRESR

Vulnerable groups

CRESR has a strong record in delivering research exploring the needs and experiences of vulnerable and 'hard-to-reach' groups. Our research portfolio includes a substantial body of work focused on vulnerable sections of the population, including:

  • homeless people, particularly marginalised subsections of this population, such as those with mental ill health, rough sleepers and the 'hidden homeless'
  • people with multiple or complex needs
  • gypsies and travellers
  • street sex workers
  • offenders

We evaluate the impact of particular interventions on vulnerable groups. For example, we examined the efficacy of family/intensive intervention projects and recently assessed the Yorkshire Prisons ETA scheme. We inform relevant policy through the production of toolkits and guidance for clients, such as for regional planning bodies looking to estimate gypsy and traveller pitch requirements. Two key areas of work involve considering the role and effectiveness of statutory and voluntary sector agencies and assessing how well the policy and legislative framework meets the needs of vulnerable groups.

Search our work


An evaluation of Cash Smart Credit Savvy

Project Director: Jan Gilbertson
Project Duration: 2016-2017

The Church Urban Fund's Cash Smart Credit Savvy project seeks to improve financial capability by offering introductory training around basic budgeting skills and through utilizing existing community links and networks to encourage participation. The use of a cascading model is designed to encourage participants to share knowledge with others and spread important financial capability messages.


Lewisham Borough Trailblazer: Exploring the Causes of Homelessness in Lewisham

Project Director: Dr Sadie Parr
Project Duration: 2017-2018

As part of the Trailblazer objective to reduce homelessness in Lewisham, and to better understand and meet the needs of homeless people, Lewisham Council commissioned the Centre for Regional Economic and Social Research at Sheffield Hallam University to carry out qualitative research exploring the causes of homelessness. This comprised two linked aims. To establish: the causes of homelessness from the homeless person’s perspective; the journeys of homeless people in terms of the services they have used to get help and support.


Apprenticeship Levy and Youth Employment: an opportunity for social investment

Project Director: Professor Peter Wells
Project Duration: 2017-2018

The Apprenticeship Levy came into effect in England in April 2017. It is intended to provide a substantial boost to skills development and to partly address the productivity gap. The government has also announced additional incentives (through Employers NI reductions) to encourage businesses to recruit groups who traditionally struggle to enter sustainable employment.

The combination of these policies potentially provides a social investment opportunity. This research project will explore the interest of employers in utilising government incentives in this area and the interest of third sector organisations in utilising social investment, with the overall goal to support young people find sustainable employment.


A service evaluation of Age UK's person centred discharge model

Project Director: Jan Gilbertson
Project Duration: 2017

Age UK is seeking to evaluate its Personalised Integrated Care Programme. This is a flagship programme and is cited as one of Age UK’s key strategic ambitions. This evaluation is concerned with a particular aspect of the Personalise Integrated Care Programme, the Age UK's pathfinder programme for person centred discharge, which supports older people at risk of extended length of stay in hospital. Two approaches to delivery have been developed and the purpose of the evaluation is to test out both approaches. The focus of the evaluation will be to to understand the level to which Age UK have achieved two intended outcomes:  

  • Improved quality of life for older people
  • Improved experience of health and social care for older people and staff.

The evaluation will provide evidence on which approach to delivery results in the best outcomes for older people.  Given the current demands on the health and social care system, evidence which demonstrates whether or not integrated services (such as the Age UK pathfinder project) can reduce or delay hospital admissions and improve outcomes for clients and staff teams is of paramount importance.


Sheffield City Region Talent Match Partnership: New Arrivals Pilot Project (NAPP)

Project Director: Nadia Bashir
Project Duration: 2017-2018

CRESR is evaluating Sheffield Futures’ Big Lottery Funded 'New Arrivals Pilot Project' (NAPP), which targets 18-24 year old Roma young people living in Sheffield. The pilot seeks to provide a bespoke engagement and preparation/assessment service to facilitate the integration of the Roma young people into the Talent Match (employment) programme.


Get in touch

For further information please contact Dr Kesia Reeve at k.reeve@shu.ac.uk or call 0114 225 4519

Key clients

Age UK
BAC-IN CIC
Big Lottery Fund
Birmingham City Council
British Red Cross
Church Urban Fund
CLAHRC Yorkshire and Humberside
Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for South Yorkshire (CLAHRC SY)
Community Links
Crisis
Department for Work and Pensions
Department of Children School and Families
Developing Initiatives Supporting Communities (DISC)
Glasgow Housing Assocation
Home Office
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Leeds City Council
London Borough of Lewisham Council
National Association for Voluntary and Community Action (NAVCA)
North Lincolnshire Council
Nottingham City Clinical Commissioning Group
Rochdale Metropolitan Borough Council
Scottish Executive
Scottish Government
Small Business Service
South East England Regional Assembly
SOVA
St Basils
Stockport Metropolitan Borough Council
Stoke-on-Trent City Council
The Social Exclusion Unit
Trussell Trust
West Yorkshire Housing Partnership
White Rose Collaboration Fund project
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