How to create resilient neighbourhoods
CRESR

Regeneration and economic development

We have a longstanding interest in researching and evaluating regeneration and economic development programmes. Our staff have national and international reputations in these areas, and many act in an advisory capacity to national and local government.

Through our wide-ranging work, we research deprived areas and populations, and the drivers and impacts of community involvement and participation. We evaluate programmes and projects that aim to support regeneration and community development, and assess their impact.

In 2010, we completed the ten-year evaluation of the New Deal for Communities initiative on behalf of the Department for Communities and Local Government. It was the largest and most comprehensive evaluation of an area-based initiative ever commissioned in the UK.

In the field of economic development, we look at local and regional economies, and what may be the drivers for economic development in a given context. We evaluate programmes and projects that aim to promote economic growth, and assess their impact on geographic areas and communities. Our research has informed EU, national, regional and local strategy and policy.

Examples of our work include

  • an assessment of schemes promoting higher level skills as a basis for improved economic performance
  • a review of rural community-based social enterprises as a basis for reviving village economies
  • a study of the economic links between coalfield areas undergoing regeneration and neighbouring cities
  • an estimate of the scale and nature of the seaside tourism industry
Search our work


A framework of indicators for measuring inclusive growth

Project Director: Dr Richard Crisp
Project Diration: 2014-2015

It is increasingly recognised that measures of economic growth such as gross value added (GVA) fail to capture the nature and distributional outcomes of growth. This is significant as growth may not necessarily benefit households living in poverty. This research addressed this by developing a framework of indicators to capture the complex and changing relationship between poverty and growth and to identify the extent of ‘inclusive growth’ in Britain’s cities and city-regions.


Rotherham Condensation study: how can problems of condensation be effectively reduced in social housing properties?

Project Director: Jan Gilbertson
Project Duration: 2014-2015

Condensation and mould is an increasing problem in social housing and the private rented sector and will worsen as fuel poverty levels rise and as more poorly installed energy efficient improvements are made to properties without allowing for removing ‘cold bridges’ and offering appropriate ventilation measures.

This project is examining how the problem of condensation can be effectively reduced in social housing properties in Rotherham. The project involves focus groups with tenants, council staff and members to explore their understanding,  perceptions and experience of the problem and dealing with it. The study will monitor 20 intervention properties which will receive improved ventilation systems and ten control properties and conduct household questionnaires and in depth interviews with tenants.     

The project team also includes Catherine Homer and Anna Cronin de Chavez (Centre for Health and Social Care Research, Sheffield Hallam University).


Oldham Warm Homes Service evaluation

Project Director: Dr Will Eadson
Project Duration: 2013-2015

An evaluation of a ‘whole household’ approach to fuel poverty. This included impact analysis of a range of different interventions, and involved valuation of outcomes with respect to its impact on health and wellbeing.


Working Links Diagnostic Tool: An assessment

Project Director: Professor Christina Beatty
Project Duration: 2015

CRESR applied knowledge and expertise in developing monitoring and evaluation frameworks to undertake a peer review assessment of a new diagnostic tool being developed by Working Links.


Recession, Resilience and Rebalancing Social Economies in Northern Ireland's Neighbourhoods

Project Director: Professor Paul Hickman
Project Duration: 2012-2015

This four year study into recession, resilience and rebalancing in Northern Ireland's disadvantaged neighbourhoods was funded by the Office for First Minister and Deputy First Minister.


Key clients

Big Lottery Fund
Coal Industry Social Welfare Organisation
Community Fund
DEFRA
Délégation interministérielle à la ville (DIV)
Department for Communities and Local Government
Department for Work and Pensions
Department of the Environment, Transport and the Regions (DETR)
Financial Inclusion Services (Yorkshire)
Foundations Independent Living Trust (FILT)
Furness Enterprise Ltd
Groundwork
Joseph Rowntree Foundation
Labour Party
Lambeth Council
Local Trust
New Deal for Communities Partnerships
North East Derbyshire District Council
Oldham Council
Visit Wales
Voluntary Action Rotherham
Wakefield Metropolitan Borough Council
Working Links
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