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Evaluation of the Cooperative Working Model

Project Director: Professor Paul Hickman
Project Duration: 2015-2018

Stoke-on-Trent City Council is reconfiguring its approach to supporting vulnerable households across the city of Stoke. This study is (principally) concerned with evaluating this new approach, which is called Cooperative Working.


Evaluation of the Tesco Bags of Help community grants programme

Project Director: Dr Will Eadson
Project Duration: 2016-2018

The Tesco Bags of Help community grants programme disburses funds collected through the single-use carrier bag charge in England and Scotland through grants for community organisations to make improvements to public space. This mixed methods evaluation will explore the impact of the grants on people, projects and on perceptions of environmental action and the role of business in environmental enhancement.


People-centred energy in Yorkshire and Humber

Project Director: Dr Will Eadson
Project Duration: 2018

This project is an exciting collaboration between CRESR, Community Energy England, Sheffield City Council and Zero Carbon Yorkshire. It will produce a compelling and robust evidence base to better understand the barriers and opportunities for local and community energy in the Yorkshire and Humber region, culminating in the launch of a Yorkshire and Humber Energy Vision, and the Yorkshire and Humber Energy Forum.


Scaling-up Social Lettings: Scope, Impact and barriers

Project Director: Professor Ed Ferrari
Project Duration: 2017-2018

This project will undertake research to understand the scope and scale of the use of Social Lettings Agencies in England. The aim is to understand what SLAs can do to improve the access to, affordability and quality of, and stability in the Private Rented Sector, particularly for households in housing needs or in poverty.


Home Temperature in Later Life (HOTELL) project

Project Director: Jan Gilbertson
Project Duration: 2018

Cold homes and fuel poverty have a direct impact on health and affect cardiovascular and respiratory conditions, mental health and excess winter illness and death. The majority of excess winter deaths occur amongst people aged 75 and over and people living in the coldest homes are at greater risk of dying than those in warm homes.  The Home Temperature in Later Life (HOTELL) project is analysing the Care 75+ data to explore vulnerability to cold home temperatures and examine links between health and wellbeing and indoor temperature.  The analysis will help identify why some older people might be at greater risk of illness and death during winter so that interventions can be better targeted and will also be used to develop further research.


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