CRESR
CRESR

Dr Tom Archer

Job title: 
Research Fellow

Phone 0114 225 2920
Email: tom.archer@shu.ac.uk

Tom is a Research Fellow at the Centre for Regional, Economic and Social Research within Sheffield Hallam. He is a member of the Housing Team, working on both qualitative and quantitative research projects.

Tom has 15 years of experience in a variety of research and policy roles in housing and regeneration. In the recent past, he managed a European street homelessness initiative, and managed action research projects for central government.

He has worked as a researcher in a large housing association and local authority housing departments. During this time Tom managed large-scale resident surveys, and conducted significant focus group facilitation, semi-structured interviewing and action learning projects.

Tom's PhD focused on the development of community-led housing in England, as a response to the current housing supply crisis. His recent academic work has centred on trends in profit-making and housing output by the largest UK housebuilders.

Specialist areas of interest

  • Community-led housing
  • Housing demand/low demand
  • Homelessness
  • The UK housebuilding industry
  • Community development
  • Social mechanisms theory
  • Social movement theory
  • Case study research

Current research projects

2017 The Value of Asset Investments, Place for People. Role: Researcher.

Selected research reports

Cole, I., Green, S., Pattison, B., Reeve, K., Wilson, I. with Archer, T. (2017) Capping aspiration: The millennial housing challenge. Sheffield: CRESR, Sheffield Hallam University.

Archer, T. and Cole, I. (2016) Profit Before Volume? Major housebuilders and the crisis of supply. Sheffield: Sheffield Hallam University.

Bennett, E., Langmead, K. and Archer, T. (2015) Editorial: Special issue - Austere relations: The changing relationship between the Third Sector, the State and the Market in an era of austerity. People, Place and Policy, 9 (2), pp. 100-102.

Archer, T. and Cole, I. (2014) Still not plannable? Housing supply and the changing structure of the housebuilding industry in the UK in 'austere' times. People, Place and Policy, 8 (2), pp. 97-112.

Related expertise

Key clients

Department for Communities and Local Government
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